Future Truck Position Papers

Future Truck Program Position Paper 2004-1: Future Systems for Protection of Electronics Subsystems Against Lightning Effects

Future truck electrical/electronic systems will encompass batteries, electronics and communication systems. Today, many electronic controllers used with components such as engines, antilock brakes, transmissions, dash instrumentation and fleet-added components (such as satellite transceivers, computers, fax and printers) are permanently damaged by effects of close and direct lightning strikes.

Future Truck Program Position Paper 2004-4: Expectations for Future Tires

This TMC Future Truck Position Paper defines the future performance requirements of tires based on fleet/equipment user descriptions of their needs and concerns. This paper covers all aspects of new tires, retreaded tires, tire repairs, and all associated maintenance issues.

Issued: March 2005

Position Paper

Future Truck Program Position Paper 2004-2: Future Electrical Systems for Protection of Electronics Subsystems Against Momentary Low/No System Voltage

Today’s commercial vehicles feature many ancillary electronic devices, such as recorders, computers, satellite systems, fax machines, printers, etc. In some cases, memory loss and erratic operation of electronic sub-systems has occurred due to momentary low or no voltage levels. The trucking industry has expressed the need for further enhancements to eliminate the effects of low or no voltage. Any improvements made should not adversely affect, and must be compatible with other vehicle systems.

Future Truck Program Position Paper 2004-3: Future Driver Vision Equipment User Expectations for Vision When Driving Heavy Trucks

Many accidents and near misses are blamed on “driver error” when in reality the root cause often is a lack of adequate vision. This TMC Future Truck Position Paper defines the vision needs of drivers and encourages the commercial vehicle industry to develop standards that will ensure consistent, reliable, and functional solutions to the vision problems experienced with current trucks (even new models).

Future Truck Program Position Paper 2004-6: Future Battery Systems

Future electrical systems encompass batteries, electronics and communication systems. Today’s battery system is a cost-effective solution. However, the trucking industry has expressed the need for further enhancements resulting in improved product performance, maintenance and safety, while meeting the increased demand for electrical energy in the parked and driving operational modes. Any improvements made should not adversely affect, and be compatible with, other systems.

Future Truck Program Position Paper 2004-5: Future Tire Retreads and Repairs

This TMC Future Truck Position Paper defines future performance requirements of retreaded tires and tire repairs according to fleet and end user descriptions of their needs and concerns. This will include all aspects of retread tires, tire repairs, and associated maintenance issues.

Issued: March 2005

Position Paper

Future Truck Program Position Paper: Future Alternatively Fueled Engines Review of Viable Alternative Fuel Options

Various groups are researching and promoting different fuels, various states are encouraging alternative fuel use, and the federal government may mandate alternative fuels for private (i.e. non-government) fleets. A number of different fuels are being considered as alternatives to conventional diesel fuel and gasoline. In addition to the “traditional” natural gas, propane and alcohols (methanol and ethanol), new ones appear periodically, such as DME, DEE etc.

Future Truck Program Position Paper: Future Driver Interface

Advanced communication systems, collision warning systems and complex display systems are finding their way into commercial vehicles. Dispatcher communications and cellular telephones are already common place. Navigational aids are becoming more popular as prices fall rapidly. Soon the communications bandwidth into a truck will increase to rates that rival current office systems. This will bring with it a proliferation of communications devices. A driver could conceivable have complete Internet access while driving.

Issued: May 2001

Tomorrow’s Truck Position Paper Series

In 1984, The Maintenance Council (TMC) of the American Trucking Associations launched a new initiative aimed at increasing awareness of equipment user needs and influence among manufacturers and suppliers. This initiative was called “Tomorrow’s Truck.” TMC undertook this mission because of a firm belief by its members that equipment users are the best source of information about the demands put upon vehicles.

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